S.1.3 Case study of lightning‐related outages on a 33 kV overhead line in the Pilbara

13/03/2014
Auteurs :
OAI : oai:www.see.asso.fr:9740:9942
DOI :

Résumé

S.1.3 Case study of lightning‐related outages on a 33 kV overhead line in the Pilbara

Métriques

10
4
935.22 Ko
 application/pdf
bitcache://c26c7cdbd2d02df8f885405b05698a5f05d88af7

Licence

Creative Commons Aucune (Tous droits réservés)

Sponsors

Co-organisateurs

ilpa_logo.png
<resource  xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
                xmlns="http://datacite.org/schema/kernel-4"
                xsi:schemaLocation="http://datacite.org/schema/kernel-4 http://schema.datacite.org/meta/kernel-4/metadata.xsd">
        <identifier identifierType="DOI">10.23723/9740/9942</identifier><creators><creator><creatorName>Franco D'alessandro</creatorName></creator></creators><titles>
            <title>S.1.3 Case study of lightning‐related outages on a 33 kV overhead line in the Pilbara</title></titles>
        <publisher>SEE</publisher>
        <publicationYear>2014</publicationYear>
        <resourceType resourceTypeGeneral="Text">Text</resourceType><dates>
	    <date dateType="Created">Wed 26 Feb 2014</date>
	    <date dateType="Updated">Tue 13 Jun 2017</date>
            <date dateType="Submitted">Fri 20 Jul 2018</date>
	</dates>
        <alternateIdentifiers>
	    <alternateIdentifier alternateIdentifierType="bitstream">c26c7cdbd2d02df8f885405b05698a5f05d88af7</alternateIdentifier>
	</alternateIdentifiers>
        <formats>
	    <format>application/pdf</format>
	</formats>
	<version>32816</version>
        <descriptions>
            <description descriptionType="Abstract"></description>
        </descriptions>
    </resource>
.

2/24/2014 1 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Presented by Dr Franco D’Alessandro PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd (info@physelec.com) ILPS 2014, 13‐14 March 2014 Slide 1 Case study of lightning‐ related outages on a 33 kV  overhead line in the  Pilbara Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Description of the problem Description of the line (geometry, withstand voltage, etc.) Lightning exposure of the line Summary of line earthing Lightning outage mechanisms Backflashovers and the importance of earthing Soil resistivity study Importance of lightning statistics Computer modelling of transients and impedance Typical mitigation / solutions  Outcomes Slide 2 Presentation Overview 2/24/2014 2 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Power outages during lightning storms.  Specific /quantitative historical information was not available,  including any remedial or mitigation measures used in the  past.  Anecdotal information was available, e.g.,:  “In the last two months, 3 lightning strikes have resulted in interruption to  mining operations – apparently all 3 events were associated with the  same  300 m section of overhead 33 kV transmission line”.  “Late 2006 / early 2007 was a particularly bad year, where we lost power on at  least 4 occasions due to lightning breaking the line”. Two types of damage:  Broken conductors Damaged insulators.  Slide 3 Description of the Problem Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014Slide 4 Description of the Problem 2/24/2014 3 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Line width is ~ 2.4 m, line  length is ~ 26 km and span  length is ~ 100 m.  Steel poles and cross‐arms  (hP = 12 m and hSW = 14.4 m).  ALP 33/720 porcelain  insulators  (mainly); some  cyclo‐aliphatic insulators  (replacements of damaged  ones).  The ALP 33/720 insulators  were not installed correctly  (should be on a 100 mm pin).  Effective CFO is ~ 185 kV  (should have been 220 kV) Slide 5 Description of the 33 kV line Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Shielding angle α is about 29° and angle β is  approximately 15° => all OK (provides protection  to at least 99%).  Other dimensions:  Steel pole base extends 2 m below grade;  Pole base diameter ~ 370 mm;  Earth rod 3 m in length is installed at roughly every  3rd pole;  Top of earth rod is 0.1 m below grade;  Earth rod is bonded to the pole base;  Earth rod is driven vertically at a distance of 1 m from  the pole base;  Slide 6 Description of the 33 kV line α β 2/24/2014 4 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014Slide 7 Lightning exposure of the line ~ 2 flashes/km2/yr Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 For 26 km of line …. Using the Eriksson formula for overhead lines in  open areas:  No. flashes per year ≈ 6 to 7 From first principles (striking distance, stroke  currents, exposure area etc.):  ▪ Simple EGM  ⇒ 16 flashes/yr ▪ Eriksson’s improved EGM  ⇒ 8 flashes/yr Hence, the lightning risk is significant.  Slide 8 Lightning exposure of the line 2/24/2014 5 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Individual pole footing resistance (disconnected): Measured values were in the range 44 – 411 Ω Dedicated earthing was not found on every third pole  per the specs supplied.  Line earthing resistance (connected to OHEW): Measured value was 4 – 5 Ω Slide 9 Summary of line earthing Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Lightning accounts for many power  interruptions in MV overhead lines via flashover  mechanisms.  Three mechanisms are the source of most  problems:  I. Direct strikes to phase conductors, because the line  is unshielded or there has been a “shielding failure”  II. Direct strikes to the shield wire or top of the pole III. Induced voltages from nearby strikes Slide 10 Lightning outage mechanisms 2/24/2014 6 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 In all three failure mechanisms, the insulation level  is a critical parameter.  There are three main factors governing whether the  insulation will undergo a flashover:  a) The waveshape and polarity of the lightning surge  voltage stressing the insulator b) The withstand characteristics of the insulators, i.e., the  “critical flashover voltage” or CFO  c) The power frequency component of the voltage across  the insulator Slide 11 Lightning outage mechanisms Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Lightning   strokes have a  very high di/dt (~ 1010 A/s);  Voltage rise due  to inductive  reactance of the  path to ground.  The footing  resistance  (impedance) is  also critical.  Slide 12 Backflashovers From:  Dr WL Vosloo presentation on Insulation Co‐ordination.   2/24/2014 7 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014Slide 13 Backflashovers Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Soil resistivity measurements were carried out at many  locations along the line.  The area was generally found to have a thin, high‐resistivity  top layer, over a lower resistivity bottom layer.  Examples:   Slide 14 Soil resistivity study Location Resistivity ρ (Ωm) Layer Depth t (m) RMS Error (%) Pole V71 L1: 2577 L2: 176 0.8 ∞ 20 Pole V62 L1: 583 L2: 153 2.4 ∞ 8 Pole V56 L1: 268 L2: 66 8.4 ∞ 13 Pole V41 L1: 7436 L2: 52 1.1 ∞ 23 Pole V29 L1: 7613 L2: 153 1.0 ∞ 24 Pole V14 L1: 2615 L2: 145 1.4 ∞ 14 Location Resistivity ρ (Ωm) Layer Depth t (m) RMS Error (%) Pole V5 L1: 4970 L2: 672 1.2 ∞ 7 Pole V1 L1: 5491 L2: 282 1.4 ∞ 9 Pole JS43 L1: 4468 L2: 59 1.1 ∞ 15 Pole JS22 L1: 536 L2: 90 2.1 ∞ 14 Pole JS4 L1: 2912 L2: 31 1.0 ∞ 18 2/24/2014 8 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 How does one deal  with this problem ?  Assuming the lower  layer is easily reached  by rods, create a  small number of soil  resistivity  “categories”, e.g.,:  S1:  0 ≤ ρ < 60 Ωm  S2:  60 ≤ ρ < 120 Ωm S3:  ρ ≥ 120 Ωm Design generic  earthing systems for  each category (E1, E2  and E3).  Slide 15 Soil resistivity study 0 200 400 600 800 0 5 10 JS22 Pole Farm V5 V14 V50 V71 Location (0 = Pole V81, 13 = Pole JS4) Lowerlayerρ(Ωm) Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014Slide 16 Computer modelling Frequency (Hz): 50 10,000 500,000 Potential rise at injection point (kV): 1040 1047 2827 Equivalent surge impedance of the system (Ω): 34.7 34.9 94.2 Total surge current flowing into the soil from the footing of each pole (kA): P1:  10.0 10.0 6.2 P2:  10.0 10.0 25.5 P3:  10.0 10.0 6.2 Frequency (Hz): 50 10,000 500,000 Potential rise at injection point (kV): 281 530 2815 Equivalent surge impedance of the system (Ω): 9.4 17.7 93.8 Total surge current flowing into the soil from the footing of each pole (kA): P1:  2.6 2.3 0.05 (leakage current from earth conductors,  P4:  2.6 2.7 0.58 including reflection effects) P7:  2.6 5.1 25.3 P10:  2.6 2.7 0.58 P13:  2.6 2.3 0.05 Model (a) Model (b) 2/24/2014 9 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Most lightning parameters vary over many orders of  magnitude.  Key parameters:  i, di/dt, waveshape (particularly front time, τ).  Decision point: what percentile value will be chosen ?  Median values ⇒ acceptance that the design caters only for 50% of  all lightning strikes !  Slide 17 Importance of lightning statistics Parameter Fixed values for LPL I Values Type of stroke Line in Figure A.595 % 50 % 5 % I (kA) 4(98 %) 20(80 %) 90 *First negative short 1A+1B 50 4,9 11,8 28,6 *Subsequent negative short 2 200 4,6 35 250 First positive short (single) 3 Qflash (C) 1,3 7,5 40 Negative flash 4 300 20 80 350 Positive flash 5 Qshort (C) 1,1 4,5 20 First negative short 6 0,22 0,95 4 Subsequent negative short 7 100 2 16 150 First positive short (single) 8 W/R (kJ/Ω) 6 55 550 First negative short 9 0,55 6 52 Subsequent negative short 10 10 000 25 650 15 000 First positive short 11 di/dtmax 9,1 24,3 65 *First negative short 12 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Numerical computations should be carried out in  duplicate to deal separately with first strokes and  subsequent strokes in a lightning flash For example, 75th percentile values for stroke  current and median values for stroke rise time give:  First strokes:  i = 50 kA, τ = 5.5 μs, feq = 45 kHz; and  Subsequent strokes:  i = 20 kA, τ = 1.1 μs, feq = 227 kHz.  Slide 18 Importance of lightning characteristics 2/24/2014 10 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014Slide 19 Computer modelling Improved earthed at every second pole Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Modelling results (voltage rise and impedance) for two locations  along the a 10‐span section of OHL (FNS = first negative strokes,  SNS = subsequent negative strokes, PF = power frequency value).  Is the CFO exceeded with the improved earthing system ?  Slide 20 Computer modelling Pole V56  (2 radials ‐ 0.5 m depth) Pole V14 (2 radials, 1.5 m depth) Strike Type V (kV) Z (Ω) V (kV) Z (Ω) FNS (50 kA, 45 kHz) 344 6.9 345 6.9 SNS (20 kA, 227 kHz) 427 21 93 4.6 PF (50 kA, 50 Hz) 237 4.7 232 4.6 2/24/2014 11 Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014 Many other calculations were carried out (too many to show in  this presentation), including outage probabilities.  It was found that the target footing impedance (per pole) for the  OHL was < 5 Ω at lightning frequencies, corresponding to ≤ 1 Ω at power frequencies (per common test equipment).  Typical solutions:  1. Improve the pole earthing (lower footing impedance via radials & rods,  earth enhancing materials, etc.);  2. Improve the line insulation / CFO (larger insulators, fibreglass cross‐arms  etc.);  3. Install surge arresters along the line at specified intervals (latest research  for this line category indicates every 3rd pole or 200 – 400 m would make a  significant difference, but a proper study is required).  Slide 21 Typical mitigation / solutions Copyright © PhysElec Solutions Pty Ltd. 2014Slide 22 Outcomes What did the client do ?